Archive for June, 2012

The Twenty Ninth of June, Two Thousand and Twelve

Posted in Daily Pictures on June 29, 2012 by Verge

Had a short day at work, anticipating the holiday week. Justin and I had to head to Iron Hill to drop off our Iron Brewer 2012 entries. I had made a chocolate chip mint dessert ale. Judging goes down on Tuesday. If I win, which is a pretty remote chance (1 of 17 entries), I will have a pretty damn good time trying to replicate my brew.

got some disappointing news from the bar tender. The Mug Club at Iron Hill is apparently illegal in the eyes of Pennsylvania. I enjoyed the last mug of my membership, an American IPA called Hopera John, named after one of their regulars, a huge Opera fan.

I take the back roads home from work, and for that matter, take the same back roads to work in the morning. It’s not shorter, or quicker, but it keeps me off the highways, and it’s so much more relaxing. Not so today. Somebody ditched, probably because of some wild animals.

took a quick nap, and went into work at Keg and Barrel. It was a long night, no air conditioning, 100 degrees outside, and soupy. Finally, the end of my work week, and headed home to look forward to the weekend in Forked River with my parents and Monika.

The Twenty Eighth of June, Two Thousand and Twelve

Posted in Daily Pictures with tags on June 28, 2012 by Verge

My job is really like a family. There’s bumps in the road, for sure, but Films has always been a close knit kind of place. Once a year (except during lock outs), the family, literally, honors those employees who have grown up inside the company.

A lot of us, many of whom were recognized today for their service, grew up in Mt Laurel, and have worked for the company our entire lives. Today, the company honored those of us who have worked for 10, 20, 25 ,30, and 50 years for Films.

I wasn’t one of them. On the record, I’ve only been employed there since 2007, but actually, I’ve been working with my peers for over 12 years, since I was 22 years old. If you don’t know who is in this picture…It’s our founder, Hall of Fame inductee Mr. Ed Sabol, and his son, our president, Mr. Steve Sabol. Their dream now employ 250 people, including me and many people I consider friends.

After the pin awards ceremony, and an incredible hilarious speech from Big Ed, the master story-teller, we headed outside for a celebration banquet and some summer games.

Along with the BBQ tent, we managed to organize 12 teams to pass the time playing Baggo. Now, I prefer Washers, but as long as the game allows for one free hand to hold a beer, I’m okay with it.

It was a double elimination tournament. Consequently, this motley crew and I were swiftly double eliminated, and then drank on the sidelines ( I cried silently in a bathroom stall, but no one has to know that). We aptly named our team the “Celluloid Zeroes.” Props to anyone who gets the reference.

Back at home, regular remodeling dreadfulness.

Eh, all my tools covered in dust. So tiring. Being rich must be fabulous.

But, Monika and I got some hang out time in the backyard, enjoyed a Thursday Martini together, and looked forward to the weekend

Eno escaped. We barely cared. Everyone deserves to run free at least once daily.

Protected: Fixing a Decade-old Mistake (just ask me for the password on facebook)

Posted in Reflections with tags on June 27, 2012 by Verge

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How to Convert a Kegerator to Dispense Home Brew from Corny Kegs

Posted in Brewing, Brewing and Kegging Step-By-Step Instructions with tags on June 26, 2012 by Verge

Working at Keg & Barrel Homebrew Supply, I have many people inquire about the next step in home brew bottling…Kegging.  Fed up with the constant sanitizing, bottling, capping, and waiting the two-three weeks it takes to “bottle-condition” (aka carbonate), many homebrewers turn to Kegging their beer.

And why wouldn’t we?  You have exactly one container to clean and sanitize instead of scores, one lid to put on, only a few hours, instead of weeks, before you can enjoy a carbonated beer (more on that in another column), and possibly the most bad-ass aspect… home brew on tap in your bar.  (When liquor is the center of attention instead of the TV, it’s no longer a Family Room)

Kegging is great, but a traditional Kegerator comes with the type of coupler to tap a standard, domestic, “D” style keg.  How can you convert your system to accommodate your new “Corny Keg” system?  Well, quite easily, and cheaply, in fact. Here’s what you’ll need

Pliers

Scissors

Flat head screwdriver

2x swivel set (either two 3/16″ inch, or one 3/16″ & one 5/16″)

2x tail piece to Male thread adapters

Yep! If you already own a Corny Keg and the taps that fit on the posts, this is literally all you need to convert your kegging system into a dual purpose server. Mind you, you’ll need the Corny taps( whether your keg is pin-lock or ball-lock) that have a MPT (male pipe threaded) tip, not a barbed tip, so make sure you ask for that at your Homebrew Store.

Your Kegerator “coupler” probably looks similar to this. The air line comes in from the side, and the beer is dispensed from the top. The lines on this one are clamped with screw clamps. Even if yours has crimp clamps, no worries. You won’t have to pry them with pliers.

Simply take your scissors and cut the lines near the coupler. Before cutting your air supply line, make sure your regulator is shut off, and the CO2 tank is closed. If you have screw clamps, remove them and save for later.

Now, unscrew the two nuts holding the old tail pieces to the coupler. Under the beer supply at the top, you’ll find a rubber gasket, and under the air supply, you’ll find a check valve. Keep both of those, as well as the nuts. The tubing and the old tail pieces you can either throw out, or slice off the tubing and save for spare parts. You won’t need them anymore for this tutorial.

You’ll now have two open tubes going to your CO2 tank, and your tower and faucet. Insert the swivel set through it’s corresponding nut and into the tubing. Remember to slide the screw clamp over the tubing first so that you can tighten it onto the barb once inserted into the tubing.

Make sure you leave a little space between the tubing and the nut on the swivel set. This is what allows you to be able to tighten the nut without twisting the hose. It’s called “swivel” for a reason.

With those secured in place, simply screw them tight to the taps on your Corny keg and you’re ready to dispense your favorite beverage.

Replace the check valve and gasket on the coupler, and attach the new MPT tailpieces to the coupler. You’re now ready to switch back to the old, traditional coupler when you run out of home brew and want to drink a Miller Lite.

Simply unscrew the air and beer lines from the Corny taps and attach them to the “D” coupler. Tap your favorite brew!

UPDATE!!!  Here's another way to do it, if your homebrew store carries the parts.  You can get tailpieces that fit onto "D" sanke couplers that are Cornelius/homebrew keg posts.

UPDATE!!! Here’s another way to do it, if your home brew store carries the parts. You can get tailpieces that fit onto “D” Sanke couplers that are Cornelius/home brew keg posts.

once screwed on, you'd be able to simply leave your corny disconnects permanently attached to the beer and CO2 lines, and either connect them to a corny keg system, or right onto a regular keg coupler.

Once screwed on, you’d be able to simply leave your corny disconnects permanently attached to the beer and CO2 lines, and either connect them to a corny keg system, or right onto a regular keg coupler.

these posts cost around 40 bucks a set, not including the disconnects seen in this picture, but they save you from having to find a wrench when you want to convert back and forth, and save you a bunch of time as well.  The only advice I can give here is this:  I would still reccoment that you have threaded swivel sets on the beer  line, instead of a barb and clamp.  That way, when in come times to clean out the beer lines, you can simply unscrew the disconnect from the swivel set and run BLC through the lines.

these posts cost around 40 bucks a set, not including the disconnects seen in this picture, but they save you from having to find a wrench when you want to convert back and forth, and save you a bunch of time as well. The only advice I can give here is this: I would still recommend that you have threaded swivel sets on the beer line, instead of a barb and clamp. That way, when in come times to clean out the beer lines, you can simply unscrew the disconnect from the swivel set and run BLC through the lines.

THIS POST HAS BEEN, BY FAR, THE MOST READ POST ON MY BLOG.  PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT TO LET ME KNOW IF MY ADVICE WORKED FOR YOU, AND IF IT WAS HELPFUL.  THANKS AND CHEERS!

The Twenty Second of June, Two Thousand and Twelve

Posted in Daily Pictures with tags on June 22, 2012 by Verge

Random pictures from the third story of NFL Films.  It was originally supposed to be finished out with more office space, but money ran out, and so now it’s just a big junk drawer of abandoned technology, old sets, and crap.

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This is a picture of my (kind of) new desk at work. I’m not official working in this new department, but I’m there two days a week, and I almost know what I’m doing. Hopefully, someday, this will be my permanent one.  Yes, they are all my computers, and notice, there is no film on my desk.

Game 4 of the Stanley Cup Final, LA Kings vs NJ Devils

Posted in Daily Pictures with tags on June 22, 2012 by Verge

Well, I was there.  Saw them win to force a game 6, but alas, the lost in that game anyway.  It was a damn fine try, though.  Here are some shots from the last minute seats me and Jim scored for free (150 face value a piece).

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